Mazda Urges Kia to Focus on Strategy Instead of Rankings in Australian Auto Sales Market

The competition between Japanese and Korean auto brands in the Australian new-vehicle sales market is heating up, with Mazda advising Kia to prioritize a sound strategy rather than targeting a higher position on the sales ladder. Vinesh Bhindi, the Managing Director of Mazda Australia, emphasized that rankings should only be an outcome of a well-executed strategy.

While Kia’s CEO, Damien Meredith, has expressed ambitions of surpassing Mazda and claiming the number two spot in the Australian car market, Bhindi remained unfazed by Kia’s plans. He pointed out that having a wide range of models does not guarantee customers, emphasizing that sales success relies on more than just product availability.

Mazda, known for consistently selling over 100,000 vehicles annually, has secured its second-place position in the Australian market for the past nine years, trailing behind Toyota. However, the company may face sales challenges in the coming years as it has retired its CX-8 and CX-9 SUV models, replacing them with higher-priced alternatives like the recently unveiled CX-70. Additionally, their popular mid-size SUV, the CX-5, is not due for a replacement until at least 2025.

Despite these changes, Bhindi reassured that Mazda does not anticipate a sales slump. The company aims to continue selling around 100,000 vehicles per year in Australia and believes they have a strong business strategy to achieve this goal. Bhindi emphasized that Mazda’s focus is on delivering quality vehicles to customers rather than solely pursuing rankings.

As the competition intensifies, Mazda encourages the industry to move away from practices such as cybercars, where vehicles were reported as sold to boost sales figures. The Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI), which publishes accurate sales numbers through VFACTS, has taken steps to address this issue and ensure transparency in the industry.

In conclusion, while Kia aims to challenge Mazda’s position in the Australian auto sales market, Mazda remains confident in its business strategy and customer-focused approach, maintaining that rankings should be a byproduct of a well-executed plan rather than the sole objective.

FAQ Section:

1. What is the competition between Japanese and Korean auto brands in the Australian new-vehicle sales market?
– The competition refers to the rivalry between Mazda and Kia in terms of market position and sales performance.

2. What advice did Mazda give to Kia regarding their sales strategy?
– Mazda advised Kia to prioritize having a sound strategy rather than solely focusing on achieving a higher position in the sales ladder.

3. What did Mazda’s Managing Director emphasize about rankings?
– Mazda’s Managing Director, Vinesh Bhindi, emphasized that rankings should be an outcome of a well-executed strategy, not the primary goal.

4. What was Kia’s plan in the Australian car market?
– Kia’s CEO, Damien Meredith, expressed ambitions of surpassing Mazda and claiming the second spot in the Australian car market.

5. What did Bhindi point out about having a wide range of models?
– Bhindi pointed out that having a wide range of models does not guarantee customers and that sales success relies on more than just product availability.

Key Terms/Jargon:

1. CX-8 and CX-9 SUV models: Refers to specific Mazda SUV models that have been retired. They have been replaced with higher-priced alternatives like the recently unveiled CX-70.

2. Mid-size SUV CX-5: Refers to a popular Mazda mid-size SUV that is not scheduled for a replacement until at least 2025.

3. Cybercars: Refers to the practice of reporting vehicles as sold to boost sales figures. Mazda encourages the industry to move away from such practices.

Suggested Related Links:

Mazda Official Website
Kia Official Website
Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries